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🙋🏽👨🏻👱🏾👩🏾👱🏻‍♀️The Latinx Collective - Issue 37

Hey you, Welcome to The Latinx Collective, a weekly email where you an expect stories that highlight
The Latinx Collective
🙋🏽👨🏻👱🏾👩🏾👱🏻‍♀️The Latinx Collective - Issue 37
By Elisabeth Rosario • Issue #37 • View online
Hey you,
Welcome to The Latinx Collective, a weekly email where you an expect stories that highlight the every day contributions being made around the country by the Latinx community, and Latino-owned businesses/books/projects to support.
As always, please feel free to reach out with article submissions, especially if you are a Latinx writer trying to get the word out on your writing.
Con cariño,
Elisabeth Rosario

THIS WEEK'S FIVE:
VICE:  A Q&A with a Panamanian photographer on new series exploring her family's roots
The Inquirer: Growing Latinx business community meets with Philly's Hispanic Chamber of Business for first ‘one-on-one’ session
Grammy.com: These Latina reggaeton/Latin trap artists are winning awards and topping streaming lists as they fight gender inequality
Bustle: 15 Books by Latinx writers you should read
VIDEO: Great storyon Latinx (music) conductor Kalena Bovell (3 min long)
VIDEO: Great storyon Latinx (music) conductor Kalena Bovell (3 min long)
Spotlight Series:
Millennial Lotería is now sold on Amazon and at Urban Outfitters
Millennial Lotería is now sold on Amazon and at Urban Outfitters
Here’s a cool story on PRI about a revamped version of Lotería, which is a bingo-like game of chance that’s mega-popular in Latin America. The way it works is that each of the traditional playing cards shows a concept based on a riddle with a moral or social innuendo — the sneaky little devil warning of bad behavior, a beautiful mermaid warning to keep a clear head or the drunk and his bottle to caution against addiction. Mike Alfaro, who grew up playing the traditional version in Guatemala, has modernized the cards to reflect millennial Latinx cultural references with his card set called Millennial Lotería. For example, his game reimagines La Dama as La Feminist, El Catrín as El Hipster, and Las Jaras as La Hashtag. His Instagram for it went viral, which you can follow here, or you can go support Mike and buy the set of cards on Amazon here.
Appreciate you checking out this week’s issue. Forward this to friends or family so they can join you in celebrating the every day contributions the Latinx community is making. You can also:
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Elisabeth Rosario

A newsletter that exists to celebrate, inspire and create thoughtful dialogue within the Latinx community. Created by @emrosario.

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